ORANGEVILLE, PA

A Breif History - Orangville was once a stop on the Bloomsburg and Sullivan Railroad, which ran from Bloomsburg to Jamison City, and the Wilkes-Barre and Western Railroad, which ran from Berwick to Watsontown. The Orangeville Train Station was built in 1868 by the Bloomsburg and Sullivan Railroad and served both passengers and freight. In 1928 the line from Bloomsburg and Sullivan was bought by the Reading Railroad Company. The Rerading Railroad operated the line to Benton until 1969 and after which the tracks had been removed. Today the station still stands but now is vacant and used for storage.

(click pictures for larger view)


In this old image of Orangeville you can see the railroad tracks coming from the left bottom corner and curving towards the center.
(image source: Internet)


Fishing Creek Express passes thru Orangeville.
(image provided by David Kline)


Orangeville Station in the 1950's?
(image provided by David Kline)


Orangeville Station in the 1990's
(image provided by David Kline)


Orangeville Station in the 1990's
(image provided by David Kline)


Orangeville Station in the 1990's
(image provided by David Kline)


In this photo taken sometime in the 1960's you can still see the tracks in front of the station.
(image provided by David Kline)


Has this Painted date been on the building since July 1944?
(photo by Andrew Hoke 3-11)


Orangeville Station in 2009
(photo by Andrew Hoke 12-09)


Orangeville Station in 2009
(photo by Andrew Hoke 12-09)


Orangeville Station in 2009
(photo by Andrew Hoke 12-09)


Orangeville Station in 2009
(photo by Andrew Hoke 12-09)


Orangeville Station in 2009
(photo by Andrew Hoke 12-09)


Orangeville Station in 2009
(photo by Andrew Hoke 12-09)


Orangeville Manufacturing Co.
You can see the railroad tracks and even a box car in the foreground.
(image provided by David Kline)

as remembered by Sarah on growing up in Orangeville in the 1940's and 1950's. - There was a telegraph machine inside the station, and the station master, Bruce Keller, was patient with all the kids that visited him. Under the south end of the loading platform, there were 2 small openings that a person could enter. We were afraid to look in there, as people said that "bums" riding the trains would sleep in there. We would put two crossed straight pins, on the track and the train made tiny "scissors" of them. If you had a penny, you could get that flattened also.

East of the station was the Mill Race, which branched off Fishing Creek. It ran past the Orangeville Manufacturing Co, then parallel to Mill Street, into the "Power House" which supplied electric power in the early days. The "race" was a very good fishing spot for trout, and my father and friends would go at night, set up carbide lights, and catch 3 ft. long eels. They would build a fire and have a cook out. We would have hot dogs because beef was more expensive.

The "race" was also a favorite swimming hole, below the bridge, and it would freeze over in the winter and provide alot of good ice skating all the way from the Manuf. Co. to the "power house."

It was a wonderful place to grow up.


All photographs, art and maps are the property of Andrew Hoke/Berwick Railfan (2009-2012) and can not be used in any way without permission. If you would like to use any of the photographs on the Berwick Railfan Photo Gallery website, or have comments and questions please EMAIL me. Please give a photo credit and a link to the Berwick Railfan Photo Gallery for any photos used either on the internet or in print.